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Sparking Goodwill: the Power Of Do-Gooders

By Tom Seest

Can These Do Gooders Light a Tiny Spark In the World?

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Larissa MacFarquhar, a New Yorker staff writer, profiles individuals who take extreme measures to assist those in need in her book Strangers Drowning. She spoke to the Tiny Spark podcast about this work as well as its inherent ethical challenges and moral conflicts.
Are you eager to contribute more good in your community? Are you eager to do more good deeds for others?

Can These Do Gooders Light a Tiny Spark In the World?

Can These Do Gooders Light a Tiny Spark In the World?

Who are the Modern Day Agents of Change?

Do-gooders are individuals who attempt to improve the world around them through initiatives like advocating for fairer treatment of women or working on sustainable solutions for poverty. Volunteer at their local foodbank or school; write blog entries detailing issues seen around them; start an organization to assist those in need; or even establish their own foundation to aid those in need. Do-gooders can be found all around the globe, from those adopting 20 children to ensuring every child has access to clean water. New Yorker staff writer Larissa MacFarquhar is one such do-gooder who recently published a book called Strangers Drowning. This week, she joined the Tiny Spark podcast to discuss her book, which profiles extreme do-gooders such as a couple who adopts 20 children or another man who founded a clinic and school in a remote jungle location. Additionally, she discussed the psychological causes behind such grand ethical commitments as well as the existential challenges of trying to do the right thing throughout a lifetime.
Since 1650, when it first appeared in “Zootomia: or Observations on the Present Manners of the English People,” do-gooders have been around. Though likely impractical and idealistic in intent even then, by the late 19th century, more people began using do-gooder as an insult for someone too eager to correct social ills or injustices, which could often prove ineffectual or annoying – such as factory owners complaining that someone’s actions interfered with their business interests – such as by telling them how better treat their employees should be treated – thus becoming pejorative term. In late 19th century use became common; used pejoratively for someone overeager in correcting social ills or injustices which was seen as ineffectual or annoying enough; by then the late 19th century it became a pejorative term to describe people too eagerly trying to correct social wrongs that it became common place; by then it had come full swing back then by then but was used pejoratively against someone overeagerly trying to do-gooding their actions could interfered with them or infringeing upon someone trying to tell them more generously treatment of their employees would likely make an accusing them of doing – for instance by being accused of doing – something do-gooder would likely become irritating or annoying when someone tried telling them better treatment might make do-gooders considered aggravainally used against these individuals that tried correct social injustices or injustices more commonly used pejorative term used against those seen as pejorative terms for people seen doing too eager or too eagerly trying correct social wrongs/inf causing interference ineffectuing against interests themselves (for instance ) when trying i n. For instance, be seen as a do-gooder as one as they’re or tell him/him more, by the way.

Who are the Modern Day Agents of Change?

Who are the Modern Day Agents of Change?

Ready to Make a Difference?

Do gooders are individuals who consciously make a decision to create positive change for the greater good. Do gooders may participate in many ways: supporting women’s rights; aiding communities thrive; fighting racism and hatred; or pushing for sustainable solutions that lift people out of poverty.
Larissa MacFarquhar, a finalist for the Helen Bernstein Award for Excellence in Journalism, joins Tiny Spark to discuss her book Strangers Drowning, which examines extreme do-gooders and the psychological roots of their noble ethics commitments.
This season of The Do-Gooders Podcast explores The Salvation Army’s national initiative, Pathway of Hope, which seeks to stabilize families and break cycles of poverty.

Ready to Make a Difference?

Ready to Make a Difference?

What Impact Can You Have?

Doing good can be overwhelming, so the Do Gooders Podcast offers listeners guidance to make an impact in their community – everything from volunteering opportunities and raising kind children, as well as tips for raising them well. This show covers it all!
Larissa MacFarquhar of The New York Times staff writes an engaging book on extreme do-gooders – people who go to great lengths to help others. She discusses these people with Tiny Spark and discusses how they balance helping while still leading stable lives; additionally, Larissa shares her own journey as an extreme do-gooder.

What Impact Can You Have?

What Impact Can You Have?

Why Should You Join the Do Gooder Movement?

Do-gooders strive to help others and make positive contributions to the world, often driven by faith or the love for humanity. Do-gooders believe helping others is one of the most essential tasks we have in this lifetime, as well as making an impactful statement in their local communities – such as volunteering at homeless shelters or collecting canned food donations for food banks, supporting global initiatives promoting human rights or environmental sustainability can all count as great acts of goodness!
Do-gooders are sometimes seen in a derogatory light, with those accused being seen as idealistic naifs or troublemakers. Do-gooders might support or perform actions they believe to be morally superior despite evidence to the contrary; someone supporting prohibition, for instance, might be perceived as such despite harming many people.
Larissa MacFarquhar joins the Tiny Spark podcast to discuss her book Strangers Drowning, which explores everyday people who go out of their way to help strangers around them despite emotional costs. She discusses both psychological causes for these grand ethical commitments as well as existential challenges associated with living a life dedicated to doing right by others.

Why Should You Join the Do Gooder Movement?

Why Should You Join the Do Gooder Movement?

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